North Carolina Personal Injury Lawyers Blog

Articles Posted in Child Injuries

We instinctually seek to protect children from harm. We make sure they can’t reach an open flame or touch the sharp edge of a blade. We keep guns out of reach and we clear coins and other small choking hazards from the hands of toddlers. blinds

Window cord blinds, on the other hand, don’t look all that dangerous. In homes throughout the country, these products are silent killers. The danger, as as been proven time and again, is that there is a risk the cord can get wrapped around a child’s neck, causing strangulation.

Although the industry has insisted that its own voluntary manufacturing guidelines and educational programs were enough to curb the danger, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is renewing its fight to ban blinds with potentially dangerous cords. Continue reading

The manufacturer of many popular children’s products has agreed to pay $3.5 million in fines to settle a case in which federal authorities alleged the company failed to report to federal regulators on a dangerous defect on one of its high chairs.
The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) reported that phil&teds created an unreasonable risk of serious injury to children with its MeToo high chair. Not only was the product defective, the agency stated, the company intentionally made claims that were false or misrepresentations when the CPSC investigators first launched an inquiry in 2011.

But despite that hefty figure, it’s likely the company will only be forced to pay a $200,000 penalty. That’s because all but this much of the fine has been suspended, based on sworn depositions by company leaders that the firm can’t afford to pay any more than this without closing shop.
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The parents of a 5-year-old boy have filed a lawsuit against a day care alleging a teacher at the center hit the child, pushed book cases at him and then allowed another child to taunt and strike him.
The Winston-Salem day care center is accused of negligent hiring of the teacher and also for negligent supervision of her actions. The two teachers accused in the case are now facing criminal charges, and they are reportedly no longer employed at the center.

As reported by the Winston-Salem Journal ,the center was the subject of a previous complaint of child abuse and neglect a month before this incident reportedly occurred.
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A number of group homes in South Carolina have received millions in taxpayer funding the last few decades, despite dozens of allegations of abuse involving those in their care.
A few have been forced to shut down, but others remain open.

One of those now shuttered was in Belton. The group home for troubled youth received an estimated $1.5 million annually in state funding. And yet, according to a recent investigation by the Post and Courier, the facility was investigated more than three dozen times for alleged abuse and neglect of the children there since 2000.

However, it wasn’t until a personal injury lawsuit was filed by one of the former residents, now a 23-year-old man, that the facility actually closed its doors. His lawsuit alleges he was raped and tortured by staff members and their friends. He claims he reported the abuse to a social worker and another employee, but nothing was done. Eventually, he said, he just gave up. And he wasn’t the only one – and neither was that facility.
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A furniture company is recalling 27 million dressers and chests because they have the potential to tip over and crush children if they are not anchored to the wall, the Consumer Product Safety Commission has just announced.
Last year, two children were killed after chests made by Ikea fell onto and crushed them, the furniture maker said. Additionally, there are at least three other child deaths dating back to 1989 that involve other models of furniture. The particular model involved in the two most recent incidents were Ikea’s Malm chests. These models were also involved in tip-over accidents that led to four child injuries. There were a total of 14 tipping incidents reported to the company by consumers using this product.

The recall notice indicates that rather than returning the furniture to stores, customers can either pick up or order a free wall anchor kit that can be affixed to the affected items. In the meantime, the unanchored furniture items should be removed out of areas where children may encounter them.
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There is no question that when we drop our children off at daycare each morning, we are putting a lot of trust in the daycare operator to do everything possible to prevent any injuries. Injuries at daycare facilities can happen in a variety of ways. Some cases involve a child not being properly supervised while eating or drinking, and the child chokes on the food. Other cases involving inattentive daycare staff allowing children to bite or otherwise assault each other. There are also many cases involving foodborne illness.

escherichia-coli-1018465-m.jpgAccording to a recent report from WBTW News 13, officials with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Controls (DHEC) has just confirmed an eighth case of E. coli, which has been traced to a now-closed daycare in Greenwood. While there are more cases possible, there has been one confirmed death of a child as result of an E. coli infection from the suspect daycare facility.

One of the owners of the daycare facility made a public statement, saying they volunteered to close the business as soon as the source of the outbreak was confirmed, and they have been working hard to clean and sterilize the building. DHEC officials say they have not identified how the E. coli strain became introduced to this particular daycare, but they are aware that four of the eight cases involved the same exact strain of E. coli bacteria. Some of the E. coli victims worked at the daycare facility, and the remaining victims were children enrolled at the center.
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Almost every American household has a television. Many have more than one. While parents are often concerned about their young children watching too much of it, these sets cause a greater hazard: Tip-Overs. television.jpg

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission reports that just between 2011 and 2013, there were 11,000 children under the age of 18 treated in hospitals for injuries involving televisions or televisions and furniture. In fact, between 2000 and 2013, 430 people – mostly children under 10 – were killed as a result of a falling television and furniture.

When all types of furniture are factored in, there are 38,000 people treated annually in tip-over accidents. Again, most of these are children. To them, the home is a playground. They explore. They climb. But the result can be a serious injury or even fatality.
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In recent months, we have been hearing more and more about daycare injuries. While some daycare operators and insurance companies like to believe this is just the latest fad in personal injury litigation, this is far from truth. The reason for an increase in personal injury lawsuits involving daycare accidents is not because there are more cases, but because the media is finally starting to give this serious and often preventable issue the attention it deserves.

childgroup.jpgOne of these tragic injury accounts can be seen in a recent article for the WV Record. Here, a mother is alleging her child’s serious injuries were a direct result of her daughter’s daycare center’s negligent conduct. According to reports, plaintiff alleged in July of 2013, daycare employees did not supervise plaintiff’s 13-month-old daughter when she tried to crawl out of her bed and, in the process, fell to the floor, sustaining an injury. Plaintiff further alleged daycare operator called her and told her that her child had fallen. Mother decided to leave work early and was on her way to the daycare center to pick up her daughter when daycare center allegedly called her back and told her not to worry, as her child was fine and child did not need any medical attention.
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Every day, we are around equipment and machinery that could inflict serious bodily injury. Whether we are riding in car, an elevator, an escalator, or using any number tools, we are at some level of risk of suffering a serious personal injury.

Most of them time, that risk is extremely small. We trust the companies that have manufactured this equipment to take all feasible precautions to make their respective products safe. However, sometimes accidents still happen, and those accidents can have serious consequences.

mower-spindle-minus-blade-1379695-m.jpgAccording to a recent report from Time Warner Cable News Charlotte, a two-year-old boy was riding on a lawn mower operated by a family member. At some point during the ride, the boy was let down from the riding mower and got his foot caught in the blade mechanism. The lawn mower blade caused severe personal injury to the young victim’s foot. Family members called 911, and EMTs arrived to provide immediate medical attention. Due to the severity of the boy’s injuries, EMTs called for a medevac helicopter. After a helicopter arrived on scene, paramedics transported him to a pediatric level-one trauma center in North Carolina. The extent of his injuries is not yet known, though it is believed they were extremely severe.
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The Occupational Health & Safety Administration reports an estimated 460,000 people in the U.S. die of sudden cardiac arrest every year. Of those, nearly 10,000 are children and many have no prior sign of heart disease.
That is more than the number of people who die from guns, breast cancer, cervical cancer, motor vehicle accidents, Alzheimer’s disease, suicide, prostate cancer, house fires and HIV – combined. However, having an Automated External Defibrillator nearby when someone suffers from sudden cardiac arrest can increase the survival rate by almost 70 percent. It’s required equipment for firefighters and paramedics.

Nineteen states – including South Carolina – require it in schools. (North Carolina is not among those.) Some even require them in all government buildings, health clubs and other facilities, and “Good Samaritan” laws have been passed in order to protect people who try to use them on someone who may be dying in order to encourage swift action.The chance of survival declines 10 percent for every minutes defibrillation is delayed. Meanwhile, the average response times for first-responders is 8 to 12 minutes nationally.
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